Jason Momoa praises Emilia Clarke after near-death experiences

Jason Momoa praises Emilia Clarke after near-death experiences

Jason Momoa was "very sad" after Emilia Clarke nearly died "numerous times" when she suffered two life-threatening brain aneurysms while filming ‘Game of Thrones’.
The 39-year-old actor – who played Khal Drogo in the HBO fantasy series – has praised his former on-screen wife (Daenerys Targaryen) for raising awareness of the condition.
He said: "I’m very sad, because we almost lost her numerous times. I love her to bits and she’s here and she’s going to do great things with it and teach the world."
Jason also praised Emilia for being "so brave" throughout the terrifying situation, after she went through "so many scares".
Speaking at the ‘Game of Thrones’ season eight premiere in New York on Wednesday night (03.04.19) – which he attended with wife Lisa Bonet – he told ‘Entertainment Tonight’: "I’ve kind of been a part of that whole situation for a very long time, so we’ve had so many scares and trying to find the right way to come out and help.
"I just think it’s beautiful that … she’s so brave in helping the world and trying to raise awareness."
Jason’s comments come just weeks after the 32-year-old actress revealed she almost died in 2011, after doctors discovered she had two aneurysms in her brain.
In an essay, she wrote: "On the morning of February 11, 2011, I was getting dressed in the locker room of a gym in Crouch End, North London, when I started to feel a bad headache coming on. I was so fatigued that I could barely put on my sneakers. When I started my workout, I had to force myself through the first few exercises.
"Then my trainer had me get into the plank position, and I immediately felt as though an elastic band were squeezing my brain. I tried to ignore the pain and push through it, but I just couldn’t. I told my trainer I had to take a break. Somehow, almost crawling, I made it to the locker room. I reached the toilet, sank to my knees, and proceeded to be violently, voluminously ill. Meanwhile, the pain – shooting, stabbing, constricting pain – was getting worse. At some level, I knew what was happening: my brain was damaged."